Lossmaker - Lossmaker




A1. Melodrama Camp 3
A2. Mann Hires Haim for Sad Caper Film
A3. Melodrama Camp 1
B1. Earlymorning Robotech
B2. Safari Embossed


Catalog # : LBL007
Release Date : 2013-04-02
Format : 12” / MP3


Buy 12” / Buy MP3


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Lossmaker's debut EP overflows with a wide-ranging mixture of musical ideas. A new project from the Brooklyn-based video artist and musician Luke Wyatt, who also records under the Torn Hawk moniker (with two releases in 2012 on the acclaimed label L.I.E.S.), Lossmaker employs the distressed collage sensibility present in both his renowned video work and the Torn Hawk project.

But while Torn Hawk's more propulsive work toys with the deconstructionist fringes of post-punk/no-wave, off-kilter mechanical funk, and crude production methods, Wyatt created Lossmaker as an outlet for more hi-fidelity, texture-obsessed pieces influenced by contemporary minimal and film composers such as Michael Nyman. The elements of decay, noise management, and framed mistakes explored in Wyatt's video output find aural expression in the five pieces on the EP, refracted through a filter of profound melancholy.

Wyatt's visual work has been described as “Video Mulch”, combining the detritus of dying VHS tapes with carefully culled computer glitchery. Recently, Wyatt has received much praise for his music videos for artists like Mi Ami, Autre Ne Veut, Matrix Metals, and La Big Vic. His two DVD releases with the DC label Peoples Potential Unlimited have become beloved cult items in the underground, and in 2010 Wyatt released a DVD of his own video work, entitled “Sad Stonewash”.


The Fader : Brooklyn’s Luke Wyatt—best known for his production as Torn Hawk and the scrambled VHS style he calls “video mulch“—debuted a new alter ego, Lossmaker, this spring with an EP on Lo Bit Landscapes. (read more) “Melodrama Camp Three” opened that record, its strings and piano a fairly quaint and stately turn for a guy best known for fucking up electronics—though there is some machine skittering idly in the background. Now, see Wyatt’s video for the track, produced in his inimitable and odd trademark fashion. In case you missed it, the whole EP is below.

Redefine Mag : Lossmaker is a project emanating from the laboratory of New York video artist Luke Wyatt. (read more) His productions in the visual and music fields are both engaging and wide-ranging; much of his work, produced under the banner Torn Hawk, use the vagaries of the defunct VHS tape format and crude digital manipulation, redolent of the deconstructionist manner of post-punk and no wave. Lossmaker is a significant departure from this, offering a sound more akin to that of Philip Glass or Michael Nyman, with perhaps a dash of John Adams. Where Torn Hawk seems to look backwards to a corrupted urban past of more recent history with a knowing playfulness, Lossmaker’s melancholic wistfulness inhabits, or evokes, a romantic landscape of yearning, grief and timeless, open vistas. This is a world away from the video mulch of his visual work with its creased VHS tape and 8-bit blocking.

Earbuddy : Lossmaker – Lossmaker EP Review Lossmaker has achieved some interesting pieces, and could definitely fit in any docudrama. (read more) Seeing as the Academy Awards was only a couple of days ago, it’s appropriate that we feature Lossmaker, the project of Luke Wyatt (aka Torn Hawk). While Torn Hawk is known for post-punk and no-wave, Lossmaker’s gaze is focused on film music; injecting his electronic lo bit landscapes with digital emotions of melancholy and tinges of joy. After hearing the self-titled release, Wyatt seems blessed (or cursed) with the obsessive, yet oft-distracted mindset of Bradley Cooper’s character from Silver Linings Playbook. Three of the release’s songs barely resemble fleshed out ideas; merely scraping the surface of what could be brighter turns. Opener “Melodramacamp3” particularly ends too soon with an under 2-minute runtime. The composition favors orchestral elements while sending them through a lo-fi funnel. That’s followed by “MannHiresHaimforSadCaperFilm” — unsure if it’s a reference to Corey Haim’s Double O Kid, which was sad in that it was ever a film. This track is lengthier and extends past six minutes without any danceable rhythm. Instead, Lossmaker’s chief intention sounds determined on mood while whirring about with dueling tones. Wyatt has been noted in the past for using his music to make messes. And if “Safari Embossed” (another 6+ minute track) is one of the musician’s fully formed ideas, then he has achieved a mess with its erratic mutations that take place throughout. It’s a bit distracting, and some spots feel unintended (mistakes, perhaps). However, some of the best art is often the result of error. Lossmaker has achieved some interesting pieces, and could definitely fit in any docudrama. Whether that’s something listeners will enjoy listening to outside of a visual component depends on their own preferences.

Aquarius Records : We had never heard of Lossmaker, aka video artist / musician Luke Wyatt, but this new 12 inch on recent Record of The Weekers Nihiti's Lo Bit Landscapes label is pretty fantastic, a strange assemblage of mini-soundscapes, cinematic and lush, textured and layered, the vibe sort of mellow and melancholic, a little Boards Of Canada for sure, but way more twisted and experimental. (read more) The opener is a brief bit of crackle wreathed chamber folk, sort of old timey, but definitely strangely soundtracky, piano and fiddle, swoonsome strings, a little haunting and dreamlike, which leads directly into the sort of Boards Of Canada style minimal electronic groovescapery, minor key melodies, over softly pulsing rhythms, the sound sweeping and darkly epic, while at the same time pensive and personal, lots of strange production happening, but it's all woven into some dreamy dark electronica. There's more of that hazy, softly psychedelic chamber music, again haunting and cinematic, this time laced with strange electronic glitches and mysterious pulsations, a dreamy, melancholy coda to the first side. The flipside begins with a brief bit of backwards melodic swirl, dreamy and super psychedelic, super hypnotic, sorta wish it was more than an intro. That leads directly into another stretch of minimal moody electronic skitter, this time, laced with acoustic instruments, some guitar strum here and there, but also some ominous synth swells, some robotic squelches, some cool super distorted melodies, all warped and warbly, the song epic and intense, getting more and more psychedelic and intense, but remaining warm and woozy and dreamlike.

Rush Hour : A new EP from L. (read more) I. E. S. associate and video artist Luke Wyatt under the Lossmaker alias. Tip!! Perhaps best known for his work as Torn Hawk, which saw a white label release on L. I. E. S. last year, as well as a track on the label’s American Noise compilation, Wyatt’s music tends towards the fuzzed out, psychedlic end of the electronic music spectrum, often utilising heavily distorted guitars and swirling effects alongside synthetic textures. It’s an aesthetic that also spills over into his trippy, heavily saturated VHS video work, which has accompanied tracks from the likes of WT Records’ Ex-Vivian and Mock & Toof’s recent single “My Head”.

Juno Plus : Lo Bit Landscapes are streaming a new EP from L. (read more) I. E. S. associate and video artist Luke Wyatt under the Lossmaker alias. Perhaps best known for his work as Torn Hawk, which saw a white label release on L. I. E. S. last year, as well as a track on the label’s American Noise compilation, Wyatt’s music tends towards the fuzzed out, psychedlic end of the electronic music spectrum, often utilising heavily distorted guitars and swirling effects alongside synthetic textures. It’s an aesthetic that also spills over into his trippy, heavily saturated VHS video work, which has accompanied tracks from the likes of WT Records’ Ex-Vivian and Mock & Toof’s recent single “My Head”. Wyatt recently revealed a new musical project, Lossmaker, which has seen a self-titled EP of material released on the US based Lo Bit Landscapes which can be streamed in its entirety below; although it shares some qualities with his Torn Hawk productions, Wyatt’s more psychedelic qualities are kept in check, with a more pensive sound delivered by its brighter synth sounds and more subdued sampling.

Ad Hoc : Though Luke Wyatt is probably known best for his video work-- including, but not limited to, collaborations with Autre Ne Veut, La Big Vic, and his two Peoples Potential Unlimited Video Party DVDs-- he's also released musical works, most recently two releases for L. (read more) I. E. S. under his jagged post-punk project Torn Hawk. His alter-alter-ego, Lossmaker, shows another side of his craft, casting more hi-def textures in a strange, stalking version of fantasy cinema soundtrack that retains his sly sense of humor while eliciting a darkness slightly more restrained than Hawk's. Track 'Mann Hires Haim for Sad Caper Film', streaming below, feels like there should be a 'Michael' tacked in front of that Mann: you can practically see James Caan pulling his car up like in Thief.

Digital Warble : Lossmaker’s twisted, electronic psychedelia debut overflows with a disparate, wild mixture of musical ideas. (read more) A new project from the Brooklyn-based video artist and musician Luke Wyatt, who also records under the Torn Hawk moniker with two releases in 2012 on the acclaimed label L. I. E. S. Lossmaker exhibits a similar distressed collage sensibility present in both his renowned video work and Torn Hawk project. While Torn Hawk’s more propulsive work toys with the deconstructionist fringes of post-punk/no-wave, off-kilter mechanical funk, and crude production methods; Wyatt created Lossmaker as a more hi-fidelity outlet to incorporate his obsession with lucid textures, film music, and the powerful allure of melancholy and harmony into his increasingly-signature vision. Wyatt’s work is often about making a mess, finding someone else’s mess, then outlining and repeating the parts that work. The elements of decay, noise management, and framed mistakes explored in Wyatt’s video output are paralleled in his surrealist audio work. He describes his musical productions as being influenced just as much by painters, young adult novelists, the 1984 LA Olympics, as it is by other people’s music. Lossmaker particularly resonates a sincere vision of balancing both humor and beauty in using these found elements to create the perfect present, rather than invoking some sort of idealized future or nostalgic past. Wyatt’s visual work has been described as “Video Mulch”, combining the detritus of dying VHS tapes with carefully culled computer glitchery. Recently, Wyatt has received much praise for his music videos for artists like Mi Ami, Autre Ne Veut, Matrix Metals, and La Big Vic. His two releases with the DC label Peoples Potential Unlimited have become beloved cult items in the underground, and in 2010 Wyatt released a DVD of his own video work, entitled “Sad Stonewash”.

Tome To The Weather Machine : Luke Wyatt probably doesn’t know this, and I have never quite had the appropriate outlet for a mash note like this, but he changed my life. (read more) Some of you had 400 Blows or some equally devastating freshman-year-in-college piece of art that blew your mind and forced you to change your major to something like film/art/contemporary miming with a minor in movement. Luke Wyatt was that for me. Seeing his “videomulch” reappropriation of straight to VHS tapes and daytime TV into real, moving visual art pieces was all I needed to jumpstart a hobby of trying to do EXACTLY THE SAME THING while never quite capturing Wyatt’s magic of juxtaposition and nostalgia. He used scanning lines and pixilated key mattes like artists use color and hue. This five song EP is Wyatt’s first foray into recorded music under the moniker Lossmaker on Nihti’s excellent, up and coming lo-bit landscape imprint. If Wyatt’s visual style is any indication on his musical approach, we could expect something more of a found-sound composition of pre-recorded sounds. Lossmaker, however, is nothing like that. Lossmaker starts with a stark and simple piano-violin duet under the light hiss of a tape recorder. It is repetitive without being cold, elegant but not overthought. This refrain is repeated later in the EP, this time the digital doppleganger to the first. Piano and violin replaced by synthesizer. Tape hiss giving way to tape decay. With five songs, Wyatt is able to keep things squarely between these poles. The rest of the EP is all guitar swirl, sometimes looped and drug under snowfort of reverb and sometimes strummed clean and direct accompanied by slow, syrupy synths and crisp beats filtered through the warm fuzz of a rerecorded VHS tape of True Lies from that one time it was shown on TV. I thnk they used to call this electroacoustic or something dumb like that. Wyatt’s other musical persona, Torn Hawk, shows up it fits and starts, usually as analogue flotsam caught in the jet stream and coughed back into the track in the form of a bit-crushed spurt of noise or out-of-joint break. Otherwise, the EP floats placidly on a lake of its own contentment with resurrecting the dead, placing itself (in the way musical lines and fragments are repeated through the composition) back on the couch in the basement of its best friend, watching reruns of Wings and Northern Exposure. Like Wyatt’s visual work, in Lossmaker he understands how much of our lives are informed by floating bits of unplaced nostalgia. In his visual work Wyatt pulls these from cancelled sitcoms, commercials for moisturizer, with Lossmaker Wyatt recalls the warped synthesizers that peeped through the static of AM college radio stations late at night that you were too young to really “get”. Lossmaker is an attempt to understand those, resurrect them for a brief moment and then send you on your way because your day is packed. Thanks Luke Wyatt, if you are ever in Swaziland/Denver/Cincinnati, I owe you dinner.

FACT Mag : Brooklyn’s Luke Wyatt—best known for his production as Torn Hawk and the scrambled VHS style he calls “video mulch“—debuted a new alter ego, Lossmaker, this spring with an EP on Lo Bit Landscapes. (read more) “Melodrama Camp Three” opened that record, its strings and piano a fairly quaint and stately turn for a guy best known for fucking up electronics—though there is some machine skittering idly in the background. Now, see Wyatt’s video for the track, produced in his inimitable and odd trademark fashion.